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Does Cherry Extract Help with Gout or Arthritic Inflammation?

Tart Cherries for Gout

Could it really be so simple? Could eating cherries or taking a tart cherry extract pills help with gout or arthritis? The 8 million or so U.S. adults affected with gout and looking for gout remedies would love to know the answer!

An article by Dr. David Williams, says yes! Tart cherry is effective for gout and here’s why:

For one, tart cherries contain powerful antioxidants called anthocyanins, which give cherries their distinctive red color. Tart cherries are actually one of the richest sources of anthocyanins 1 and 2, which help block pro-inflammatory COX-1 and COX-2.

In a more recent 2003 study, 280 grams of cherries (about 45 cherries) were given to 10 healthy women. Blood uric acid levels decreased by 14% after five hours, and excretion of uric acid increased.

And in a 2011 study, 10 overweight and obese participants consumed 8 oz per day of either 100% tart cherry juice or a placebo for four weeks. Although participants had normal uric acid levels, seven participants displayed reduced serum uric acid levels after drinking tart cherry juice. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), an indicator of chronic inflammation, was significantly lower with the tart cherry juice versus placebo.

Several findings reported by Medscape, associate cherry juice intake with a decreased incidence of gout attacks. “A much lower occurrence was greater in those who consumed two servings/day of cherry fruit compared to those who consumed one serving, with risk found to be further reduced in those consuming three servings/day.”

The Journal of Arthritis & Rheumatology backs up this report in this 2012 article.

In a clinical study in 2002, the Journal of Clinical Nutrition set out to determine the effects of cherry consumption on 10 healthy women. “A decrease in plasma urate after cherry consumption supports the reputed anti-gout efficacy of cherries. The trend toward decreased inflammatory indices (CRP and NO) adds to the in vitro evidence that compounds in cherries may inhibit inflammatory pathways.”

What kind of cherries? Most of the articles I read referenced fresh bing cherries. Which is great because those are really the only kind of cherry I like. The others are just too sweet.

So what if you don’t like cherries or, can’t eat them in large enough quantities? There are several different kinds and forms of black cherry fruit or cherry extract available here that may be helpful with gout.  Cherry Extract

One of the more popular cherry fruit supplements is Terry Naturally’s Cherry Fruit Extract Freeze Dried in capsules. If you’re familiar with Terry Lemerond of Terry Naturally, you know he has a long and successful history in the natural health field so it’s easy to understand why this particular supplement is one of the best sellers in this category. The freeze dried cherry fruit might be the secret in this supplement.

What else can you do naturally to help with gout? Of course, eliminate or greatly reduce alcohol consumption. Secondly, drinking plenty of water may help too! A study showed that staying well-hydrated can help – perhaps because the uric acid becomes more diluted. Eliminating or reducing sugar may be helpful too.

While most studies refer to gout relief with cherry consumption, it may also be helpful for certain kinds of arthritis.

joint gs formulaHowever, if cherry extract alone doesn’t do the job for your arthritic condition, there are also combination type formulas with cherry such as Joint GS Formula by Solaray. Joint GS Formula is an interesting combination of glucosamine, chondroitin, bromelain, sea cucumber and a proprietary blend of black cherry, devils claw, burdock and celery seed. This combination offers anti-inflammatory support, and nutrients to support cushioning between joints, in addition to helping to rebuild cartilage.

Give cherry extract a try if you need gout or arthritis relief. The bonus is, it is a great antioxidant and also has heart healthy benefits too!

Additional Sources:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/05/040510010724.htm

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/80328

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